Muhlenberg County Health Department

Prevent, Promote, Protect.

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Muhlenberg County Health Department Lead Poisoning Information

Kentucky Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (KCLPPP) is part of the Healthy Homes Initiative and offers a comprehensive approach to primary and secondary prevention of childhood and prenatal lead poisoning and other housing-related health hazards.

Primary prevention includes activities such as blood lead screenings for at-risk populations and education on preventive strategies to decrease childhood and prenatal lead hazard exposure.

Secondary prevention includes case management follow-up for elevated blood lead levels, medical and environmental services, epidemiologic studies, education and connections to other professionals and programs.

Other links for lead information

http://www2.epa.gov/lead

http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/healthy_homes

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/lead/index.html

What Do Parents Need to Know to Protect Their Children?

Protecting children from exposure to lead is important to lifelong good health. Even low levels of lead in blood have been shown to affect IQ, ability to pay attention, and academic achievement. And effects of lead exposure cannot be corrected. The most important step parents, doctors, and others can take is to prevent lead exposure before it occurs.

Update on Blood Lead Levels in Children

Children can be given a blood test to measure the level of lead in their blood. Until recently, children were identified as having a blood lead level of concern if the test result is 10 or more micrograms per deciliter of lead in blood. Experts now use a new level based on the U.S. population of children ages 1-5 years who are in the top 2.5% of children when tested for lead in their blood (when compared to children who are exposed to more lead than most children). In the past, blood lead level tests below 10 micrograms per deciliter of lead in blood may, or may not, have been reported to parents. The new, lower value means that more children likely will be identified as having lead exposure allowing parents, doctors, public health officials, and communities to take action earlier to reduce the child’s future exposure to lead. What has not changed is the recommendation for when to use medical treatment for children. These new recommendations do not change the recommendation that chelation therapy be considered when a child is found with a test result of greater than or equal to 45 micrograms per deciliter of lead in blood.



Important Health Links

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services
American Heart Association | Web MD
Centers for Disease Control | American Diabetes Association


105 Legion Dr. | Central City, KY 42330
(P) 270-754-3200 | (F) 270-754-5149

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